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Biking Your Way to Better Health

When is the last time you smelled the lilacs in springtime during your morning commute? Or pulled into the parking lot with a big smile plastered across your face, pumped with endorphins and ideas?



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When is the last time you smelled the lilacs in springtime during your morning commute? Or pulled into the parking lot with a big smile plastered across your face, pumped with endorphins and ideas? Or lost weight just by going back and forth to work every day? Likely never, if you slide behind the wheel of a metal box and fight the freeway each morning. But what if one day you left the car in the driveway and rode a bike instead? On May 17, National Bike Day, leave the car in the driveway and ride your bike instead! Use it is an opportunity to start a new habit!

Riding a bicycle can be an excellent fitness activity for the entire family. It’s a good calorie burner (you’ll use between 400 and 700 calories an hour) that serves a dual purpose: On one hand, cycling provides an aerobic workout, and on the other, it builds leg muscles without stressing joints. Not only is it good exercise, but it is also a great way to spend quality family time! Below are 5 great reasons to bike to work:

  1. Health: The health benefits of regular aerobic exercise are well-known. You can easily burn 600 calories an hour through brisk cycling. Most bike commuters report losing 15 to 20 pounds during their first year in the saddle without changing their eating habits.
  2. Money: Between fuel expenses, insurance, maintenance and car payments, biking rather than driving can save you serious dough.
  3. Time: Have a hard time working exercise into your daily routine? If your 10 minute drive to work takes 20 minutes on bicycle, you only have to give up 10 minutes of your busy day to get a 20 minute workout.
  4. Environmental: Bicycles produce no meaningful pollution when in operation. Bikes don't have tailpipes belching poisonous fumes into the atmosphere. They also eliminate the oil, fuel and hydraulic fluids dripped by automobiles onto the road surface — which means less toxic runoff into local waterways.
  5. Fun: Biking is just plain fun. Whether you're speeding down an asphalt hill, navigating your mountain bike over tree roots, or cruising the country roads — cycling is a good time.

Here are some tips to make the most of cycling:

  • Pick a destination. Be sure to know where you’re going, what route you will take to get there and how to get home.
  • Find the right bike for yourself and your kids. Bikes should be sized according to your body proportions. An adult should be able to straddle a bike with both feet flat on the ground and have 1-2” of clearance. Children should also be able to comfortably straddle the bike with feet flat on the ground. They should also be able to get onto the bike seat by slightly tipping the bike to one side.
  • Treat your bikes to a professional tune-up to make sure you’re ready to go before the ride. You can also make it a family project for you and your kids to check the air in your tires, chains are oiled, etc. before every ride.
  • If you’re just starting, begin slowly and on flat terrain to avoid injury and burnout. Gradually increase your mileage, time and tough-terrain goals. Keeping a cycling journal that notes your progress can be inspiring.
  • Stretch before and especially after you ride, paying special attention to your hamstrings, thighs, buttocks, back and neck. You’ll prevent some soreness and injury this way.
  • If cycling is your main form of exercise, consider adding a series of upper-body, weight-resistance exercises to your routine to keep the top half of you well-toned, too. Consider trying Fort HealthCare’s Upper Body Sculpt class, which targets the back, shoulders, biceps and triceps in a 30-minute express class!
  • Don’t wear headphones while biking. In most states it’s illegal, and it’s always unsafe.
  • Obey all traffic laws and always wear a helmet!
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Behold the Power of 10%

Fort HealthCare’s Slimdown Challenge participants can finally see the finish line! The challenge is coming to a close with final weigh-outs on May 13 after employers and community agencies teamed up to slim down in a 12-week challenge with a goal to drop at least 10% of their body weight.



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Fort HealthCare’s Slimdown Challenge participants can finally see the finish line! The challenge is coming to a close with final weigh-outs on May 13 after employers and community agencies teamed up to slim down in a 12-week challenge with a goal to drop at least 10% of their body weight.

Teams and individuals dropping 10% of their weight are eligible for much more than just tangible prizes. There are many benefits to losing 10% of your body weight that can be very rewarding:

  1. More energy
  2. Better breathing
  3. Enhanced sex life
  4. Better blood pressure
  5. A healthier gallbladder
  6. Decreased risk for diabetes
  7. Decreased risk for colon and breast cancer
  8. Improved health and lower cholesterol levels
  9. A better night’s sleep for those with obstructive sleep apnea
  10. Less pain associated with arthritis, joint disease, and lower back pain

Not convinced, yet? We hope that these extra incentives will motivate you to drop that 10%:

  • A Healthier Heart. By losing 10% of your body weight, you can lower your cholesterol and reduce your blood pressure, two major risk factors for heart disease.
  • Lower Risk for Type 2 Diabetes. If you’re overweight, you’re at increased risk for Type 2 Diabetes, which means your body can’t make enough or properly use insulin, a hormone that helps covert food to usable energy. By losing just 10% of your body weight, you’ll improve your body’s ability to use the insulin it makes, possibly preventing the onset of the disease. If you already have Type 2 Diabetes, shedding that 10% may improve your symptoms and possibly prevent further complications.
  • More Pep. Just 10% weight loss increases vigor and vitality. You’ll feel better and have more energy.
  • A Mental Edge. Losing 10% can give you the self-confidence and motivation you need to keep going. Success builds on success, but be sure to recognize it. Losing 10% is a milestone in the weight loss journey. Take the time to congratulate yourself on your efforts.
  • Reality Check. After losing 10%, you’ll gain a sense of what it will take to lose the rest and reach your final goal weight.

As the competition comes to a close, remember the intangible health benefits of losing 10% of your body weight, and challenge yourself to reach your intended goal. Visit the Slimdown Challenge website for weigh-out details. Whether participating in the challenge or not, becoming “Wisconsin’s Healthiest Community” is a mission accomplished one person at a time. So start today and make the commitment to yourself, and visit http://forthealthcare.com/LetsDoThis/ for endless opportunities to learn about wellness, nutrition and medical conditions.

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TGINF (Thank God Its NOT Fry Day)

While you can’t undo past sun damage, change your complexion or erase a family history of melanoma, you can take future precautions to prevent skin cancer. Every hour, an American dies from melanoma, usually as a result of inadequate sun protection.



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While you can’t undo past sun damage, change your complexion or erase a family history of melanoma, you can take future precautions to prevent skin cancer. Every hour, an American dies from melanoma, usually as a result of inadequate sun protection.

May is Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month, and while skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, with millions of people diagnosed annually, it is also the most preventable of all types of cancer.

Many people strive for that golden glow, but just one sunburn can significantly increase your chances of developing melanoma. Taking preventative measures is easy with these simple tips:

  • Stay out of the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when sun’s rays are the strongest. Seek shade under an umbrella, tree, or other shelter.
  • Avoid tanning beds. Indoor tanning has long been linked with skin and eye cancer, and the high concentration of UV rays puts people at greater risk.
  • Apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen and lip balm with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher and reapply every two hours while outside. The sun’s rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. Most sun protection products work by absorbing, reflecting, or scattering the sunlight. Higher SPF’s indicate more protection; however, sunscreen wears off, so apply it every two hours and after you swim or sweat.
  • Wear protective clothing, including a hat and sunglasses. Loose-fitting long-sleeved shirts and long pants made from tightly woven fabric offer the best protection from the sun’s UV rays. Darker colors may offer more protection than ligher colors; however, if wearing this type of clothing is not practical, at least try to wear a T-shirt or beach cover-up. Additionally, a canvas, tightly woven hat with a brim all the way around shades your face, ears, and the back of your neck.

While anyone can be affected by skin cancer, people with the following risk factors should take extra precaution:

  • Family history of melanoma or other forms of skin cancer
  • Personal history of many moles (more than 25)
  • Large moles (larger than a pencil eraser)
  • Aypical or unusual-looking moles
  • Fair skin
  • Light eye or hair color
  • Suppressed immune system
  • Excessive sun exposure as a child or adult
  • Tannning salon usage
  • Sun sensitivity

Fort HealthCare dermatologist, Robert Glinert, MD has been temporarily away from Fort HealthCare since June 2012, as he began fellowship training in skin cancer treatment at Harvard University. Over the past few years, there have been several major breakthroughs in the understanding of skin cancer, and it is becoming increasingly clear that most cancers have a genetic basis. Dermatology is entering a new phase in cancer diagnosis, and treatments are developing that will rely heavily on new molecular testing and targeted, personalized treatment. Upon his return in coming months, he will bring expertise in the identification and treatment of melanoma and other skin cancers.

To make an appointment with Dr. Glinert, call (920) 568-1000. Appointments will be available in August, at the earliest. If you are concerned about a mole or possible skin cancer, contact your primary care physician for a referral.

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Defeating the Vending Machine Villain

When someone says, "I’m just going to grab something quick from the vending machine," it can almost always be interpreted as "I’m hungry; I think I’ll eat some junk food."



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When someone says, "I’m just going to grab something quick from the vending machine," it can almost always be interpreted as "I’m hungry; I think I’ll eat some junk food." This phrase seems to be more prevalent as busy businesspeople, parents, students, and even children look for something quick to quench their hunger, at least for a little while.

It is always best to be prepared by having a healthy snack along with you at all times, but when the vending machine seems to be the last resort, use these tips to make healthier decisions:

  • For those who are lucky enough to have access to vending machines with healthier options, opt for fresh fruits and vegetables first. They are usually the lowest in calories and highest in fiber, and they pack a nutritional punch.
  • To save unnecessary calories on beverages, choose flavored water, unsweetened iced tea, or milk.
  • Aim to keep your snack choice to 100 calories. Also, play close attention the number of servings you’re given, and share with a friend if temptation typically gets the best of you.
  • Choose the foods that offer more nutrients or good-for-you ingredients, even though they may be difficult to spot. By eating a snack with nutritional substance, you can satisfy your hunger for longer. For example, protein-packed trail mix (skip the packs with the chocolate) and whole-grain chips are better options that provide at least some nutritional value. If you can’t fight the sweets monster, go for Peanut M&Ms or Fig Newtons. Although both are fairly processed, the peanuts in the M&Ms balance out some of the damage done by the chocolate candied coating and the synthetic food dyes, and the ingredient list on Fig Newtons is quite small and simple-figs are the second ingredient.
  • Are you really hungry or possibly just thirsty? People may sometimes mistake their dehydration for feelings of hunger. Try drinking a bottle of water first, and then reassess. Who knows?! You may forget all about those feelings of "hunger."

Fort HealthCare registered dietitians are available for private consultation to assist both adults and children with healthy eating, living with dietary restrictions and creating personalized dietary programs. A referral from your doctor is needed for insurance coverage. In addition to the numerous nutrition, health and wellness classes Fort HealthCare offers, the Let’s Do This! web portal provides endless opportunities to learn about wellness, nutrition and medical conditions for everyone including families, men, women, employers and communities.

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Schools Out for the Summer-is your child ready to stay home alone?

It is natural for parents to feel anxious when first leaving kids without supervision, but you can feel confident by preparing your child with some simple planning and even a few trial runs.



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It is natural for parents to feel anxious when first leaving kids without supervision, but you can feel confident by preparing your child with some simple planning and even a few trial runs. Here are some tips to consider:

Do a practice run. You may be unsure if your child is ready to be alone for an entire day during the summer, so make a couple trial runs. Let your child stay home alone for a shorter period of time-30 minutes to an hour-while you run an errand. Make sure you remain nearby and can be easily reached. When you return, discuss with your child how it went, how they felt and things that could be changed for next time.

Expect the unexpected. It is important to prepare your child with the knowledge and skills to handle a potential emergency. Before being left alone, your child should be able to complete certain safety measures. A few precautions include knowing your home address, how and when to call 911, locking and unlocking doors, operating the lights and microwave, and knowing what to do if there is a fire, tornado or other severe weather, power outage, a stranger calls or comes to the door, etc. Fort HealthCare regularly offers courses in First Aid, CPR and AED training, and classes more specific to children’s safety at home, including On My Own at Home (May 18) and Camp 911 (June 12 and August 22).

Cover the bases. After you decide you child is ready to stay home alone, make sure you cover all of the bases and are fully prepared for this big step. Here are a few more steps that can make the experience a breeze:

  • Schedule a time to get in touch. Figure out a time that is convenient for both of you and make it a routine. It also wouldn’t hurt to make a tentative schedule with your child for their time alone.
  • Set ground rules. Establish some rules and make sure your child understands them.
  • Stock up. Make sure your house is stocked with emergency supplies and even some healthy snack options. If your child needs medication, leave only the precise dose, minimizing risk of accidental overdose or ingestions.
  • Childproof your home. Be sure to lock up anything that could be a health or safety risk for your child, including alcohol, tobacco, lighters and matches, medications, car keys, guns, etc.

So, are you and your child ready? Fort HealthCare can help prepare your family to take this next step. Camp 911, a one-day program focusing on safety, prevention techniques and health and wellness for children entering fourth through sixth grades in the upcoming 2013-2014 school year, will be held Wednesday, June 12 and Thursday, August 22 from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Fort Memorial Hospital. The registration fee is $15 per child. Camp 911 will provide children the knowledge, skills and confidence to protect themselves, react safely in emergency situations and increase awareness of health and wellness. Visit FortHealthCare.com/Classes to register online. Space is limited to 70 participants per session and registrations are based on a first-come, first-served basis.

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Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Aaachoo! What to do when allergies are too much

Allergies can develop at any age, or recur after many years of remission. It is not uncommon for allergies to gradually develop over time. With the help of an ear, nose, and throat specialist (ENT), allergy symptoms can usually be prevented or controlled, resulting in a major improvement in quality of life.



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Locally-grown produce at Fort HealthCare Farmers Market

Despite the ongoing winter, fresh vegetables are beginning to appear and will be ready this month. Every Wednesday, from 2:30-5:00 p.m., Peggy Boshard of Peace of Eden Farm will be selling locally-grown veggies on the Mezzanine at Fort Memorial Hospital. Enter through the revolving doors on Armenia Street for the easiest access. The season will kick off with spinach, arugula, mixed greens and herbs.



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Fort HealthCare recognizes importance of volunteers during National Volunteer Week

Fort HealthCare recognizes its wonderful volunteers during National Volunteer Week, April 21-27. The week focuses on inspiring, recognizing and encouraging people to seek out ways to engage in their communities.



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Fort HealthCare recognized as Organization to Watch

Fort HealthCare has been named to the list of 100 Health Care Organizations to Watch in 2013, published recently on MHAPrograms.org, the website of the national organization that represents universities offering Master’s degree programs in health services administration.



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Becoming Baby-Friendly at Fort HealthCare

Over the next three years, Fort HealthCare will journey to become a ‘baby-friendly’ accredited facility. The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) is a global program that was launched by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in 1991 to encourage and recognize hospitals and birthing centers that offer an optimal level of care for infant feeding and mother/baby bonding.



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Fort HealthCare Center for Joint Replacement receives high marks

The Center for Joint Replacement at Fort Memorial Hospital was recently recognized by Marshall Steele & Associates (MS&A), a healthcare consulting and management company, for achieving exceptional results in the treatment of patients receiving hip and knee replacements.



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Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.

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Slow-Cooker Turkey Stroganoff

A split turkey breast is a terrific cut to use in this healthy slow-cooker recipe, from EatingWell, for turkey stroganoff because it stays moist. Here turkey breast is cooked in the crock pot with lots of mushrooms and carrots, then pulled off the bone, chopped and stirred back into a creamy sauce. Serve over whole-wheat egg noodles, on mashed potatoes or even thick slices of toasted whole-grain country bread.



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A split turkey breast is a terrific cut to use in this healthy slow-cooker recipe, from EatingWell, for turkey stroganoff because it stays moist. Here turkey breast is cooked in the crock pot with lots of mushrooms and carrots, then pulled off the bone, chopped and stirred back into a creamy sauce. Serve over whole-wheat egg noodles, on mashed potatoes or even thick slices of toasted whole-grain country bread.

Prep time: 30 minutes
Ready in: 4 ½ or 8 ½ hours
Servings: 6 servings (1 1/3 cups stew & 1 cup noodles each)

Ingredients

  • 8 cups sliced mixed mushrooms (about 20 ounces)
  • 3 medium carrots, sliced
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1 3- to 4-pound split turkey breast, skin removed, trimmed
  • 1 cup reduced-fat sour cream
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup dry sherry (see Tip)
  • 1 cup frozen peas, thawed
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 8 ounces whole-wheat egg noodles (6 cups dry), cooked
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped flat-leaf parsley

Preparation

  1. Combine mushrooms, carrots and onion in a 5- to 6-quart slow cooker. Add turkey, meat-side down. Cover and cook on High for 4 hours (or on Low for 8 hours).
  2. Transfer the turkey to a cutting board.
  3. Whisk sour cream, flour and sherry in a bowl. Stir into the slow cooker along with peas, salt and pepper. Cover and cook on High until thickened, about 15 minutes.
  4. Remove the turkey from the bone and cut into bite-size pieces; cover to keep warm. When the sauce is done, gently stir in the turkey. Serve over noodles, sprinkled with parsley.

Nutrition

  • Per serving : 437 Calories; 6 g Fat; 3 g Sat; 2 g Mono; 110 mg Cholesterol; 43 g Carbohydrates; 46 g Protein; 7 g Fiber; 526 mg Sodium; 865 mg Potassium
  • 2 1/2 Carbohydrate Serving
  • Exchanges: 2 1/2 starch, 1 1/2 vegetable, 5 lean meat, 1 fat

Tips & Notes

  • Make Ahead Tip: Prep vegetables and turkey; cover and refrigerate separately for up to 1 day. | Equipment: 5- to 6-quart slow cooker
  • Use dry sherry instead of "cooking sherry" in recipes calling for sherry. It adds depth of flavor to sauces and stews like stroganoff, without adding the extra salt that’s typically in cooking sherry. Look for dry sherry with other fortified wines at your wine or liquor store.
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